Durex is the number one condom manufacturer in the world. They are well known in the west for their quality and the humorous tone used in their advertising. With near 700 million netizens in the China, the web has become a great testing ground for the brands Chinese communication strategy.

A digital museum about sex. What?

In possibly a world’s first, 12 artists joined Durex in creating the very first online sex museum. Accessible by the very popular (in China at least…) QR codes, it is an experience between eroticism and art. Putting an emphasis more on intimacy rather than plain sex, the site reached over 1 million views on its launch day.

You can watch the trailer for the “grand opening” here:

Durex Art museum trailer from jiamin liu on Vimeo.

This is not the first attempt by Durex to woo Chinese consumers. We will explain more about Durex’s marketing strategy, and how they have attempted to overcome the Chinese anti-pornography agency point of view.

durex-sex-art

Walking a very fine line

The condom maker always steals a smile from us with its approach to advertising.  This is a great achievement in itself given its area of expertise, where it could easily cross the line into crude territory.  Too much and you risk upsetting people, too light and it is without flavor. It is hard to get it just right.

It is especially difficult in China where sex is considered taboo. Durex, as a brand, is well aware of this, and therefore tries to push “educational” campaigns to a country where the government ideology goes solely along the lines of health and necessary sex education.

So if the adults are no help, where do young Chinese turn to when they want to know more about intimacy? You guessed it, the internet- making it the perfect platform for Durex to focus their Chinese campaigns.

Durex is a market leader, and with 45% market share in China they have conquered the heart and beds of the Middle Kingdom. But they are pushing a very daring plan for their brand image; taking a risk experimenting in the way they communicate with the market. Undoubtedly, this has driven success in the west.  But in China, authorities push a “prude” ideology on its population and this can clash with the racy content.  I guess you cannot be naughty and stay out of trouble in the same time!