Cyberspace Administration of China

As we all know, China takes control of information very seriously. They have recently suspended over 580 social media accounts, accusing the owners of “ignoring their social responsibilities, abusing their influence, staining the honour of the state and disrupting social order” according to the Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC).

Read also: China finds it can’t arrest rumours on social media

That same organisation ordered other websites to get rid of 2000 rumours about government policies relating to transportation, food safety and public policies.  In response to recent “inaccurate news stories”, the Cyberspace Administration of China spokesperson Jiang Jun reminded all the news providers to follow journalistic ethics.

China and other countries

“Every netizen enjoys freedom of speech when publishing information online, but posting rumours that violate civil rights and harm public interests must be condemned on moral grounds and in accordance with the law,” said Jiang Jun, CAC spokesperson.

Weibo

Many of the accused users were really popular, followed by thousands of people on social medias as Weibo, the Chinese Twitter. Weibo is the main source of information in China and this is why it’s a big issue for the government who want to control the whole Chinese internet traffic.

Interesting: 5 innovative social media strategies in china for 2016

There is 190 million of active users each month and more than 60 000 post and repost each minutes. Information flows very quickly. If you are popular and you post something considerate as a rumour by the government, even if they delete it one hour after you posted it, you will reach a lot of people.

Due to that, China is taking steps to strengthen the internet censorship.

Now, the “creative content” as video, games and cartoons are concerned by the censorship. From next month, foreign websites will have to get approval from the State Administration of Press, Radio, Publication, Television and Film before publishing content.

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